The Forbidden

As she prepared to leave the sun went in, and the bands of light faded. She glanced over her shoulder at the boarded windows, and saw for the first time that one four-word slogan had been sprayed on the wall beneath them. “Sweets to the sweet” it read.

I’m currently reading Christine but as I mentioned before, it’s quite the sizeable tome and hasn’t been the quickest read. I felt like taking a quick break from Uncle Stephen for a moment to read this short by his horror contemporary, Clive Barker. In fact, the anthology that houses this story – Books of Blood: Volumes 4-6 – features a cover blurb from the man himself: “Clive Barker is so good I am almost literally tongue-tied.”

Cute, huh?

The Forbidden in case you weren’t aware, is the story that inspired (and was adapted into) my favourite horror movie of all time, Candyman (1992).  So no prizes for guessing why I wanted to read it. The novella is based in England rather than the Chicago of the film which really intrigued me – and tells tale of Helen, a post-grad student doing her thesis on urban graffiti. When she visits the rundown Spector Street Estate to take some photographs for her project, she learns about a horrible murder and becomes just a little bit too involved in the sinister goings on.

Her weary body understood. Her nerves, tired of jangling, understood. The sweetness he offered was life withoutliving: was to be dead, but remembered everywhere; immortal in gossip and graffiti.”Be my victim,” he said.”No…” she murmured.

*Spoilers*

I loved it. The Candyman of the story is every bit as seductive as my boo Tony Todd but he’s terrifying in such a visceral way. The way he’s described is so different and heinous, yet there’s still something appealing about him, like giving into the death he’s offering would be the sweetest relief and delicious to boot.

Some of the names are the same as in the movie (Trevor, Anne-Marie, Bernadette) – even patronising shit-bag Purcell makes an appearance – and I loved his little segment but they are quite different characters. Trevor is still a cheating bastard but this time Helen turns a blind eye, claiming not to give a single shit when he disappears for two nights straight. The setting is very similar, even if the locations are not, right down to the rotten public toilet in which an  alleged attack is made on a young man with learning disabilities.

The crime surrounding Anne-Marie and her son is far more sinister and graphic however and I find the realism of the estate much creepier than I do Cabrini Green. Maybe it’s just how normal and mundane Anne-Marie’s life seems, how can such horror live side by side her tiny maisonette, while she makes tea for Helen and moans about the council?

A must-read for any horror fan and I’m quite keen to read the rest of the stories now. Barker writes beautiful prose that sure as hell suits the elegance of the Candyman. I’ll keep you updated on my progress.

 

Book details:

The Forbidden (from Books of Blood: Volumes 4-6)
Publisher: Sphere (1 Feb. 1988)
ISBN-10: 0751512257
ISBN-13: 978-0751512250
Borrowed

What are you reading?

I Wish I Knew How To Quit Boo – Stephen King Edition

I’ve decided to leave the rest of my year (and then some) open for Stephen King. Books, that is but if the man himself wanted to stop by and take me on a couple of dates I probably wouldn’t say no. Imagine the chat.

Anyway, the UK is a rainy grey place right now so what better environment in which to get cosy with The King? Loose jersey lounge wear, blankets and lashings of horror – it’s the only medicine I need. I’ve made a loose plan to read in tandem with my horror partner Matt but he’s already speeding ahead on our first book so we might have to go our own ways eventually.

Here’s what’s on my reading list:

The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon: Halloween Edition

Tricia is lost in the woods. But she’s not alone . . .

‘The world has teeth and it could bite you with them anytime it wanted. Trisha McFarland discovered this when she was nine years old. Lost in the woods.’

Trisha has only veered a little way off the trail. But in her panic to get back to the path, Trisha takes a turning that leads into the tangled undergrowth. Deeper and deeper in the terrifying woods.

This is first on the list mostly because it’s considerably shorter than the others. I’m about 50 pages in and it’s a real page turner. Trisha is nine years old and sick of the arguing between her mum and brother, following her parents’ divorce. On a hiking trip, she takes just a second to have a pee and gets lost. Alas the woods is a big place for a small girl – and it seems she isn’t the only one out there…

TGWLTG is so far wonderfully (horribly) visual and real – and Trisha really feels like a girl her age, albeit a wise one. I like her a lot and I’m looking forward to the rest of her story. Please let her be okay!

Christine: Halloween Edition

Jealousy isn’t a green-eyed monster. She’s a red Plymouth Fury.

Christine, blood-red, fat, and finned, is twenty. Her promise lies all in her past. Greedy and big, she is Arnie’s obsession, a ’58 Plymouth Fury. Broken down but not finished.

There is still power in her – a frightening power that leaks like sump oil, staining and corrupting. A malign power that corrodes the mind and turns ownership into Possession.

‘This is the story of a lover’s triangle…’

Matt got me this last year for my birthday and I’ve been waiting for the best time to crack her open ever since. I love John Carpenter’s 1983 adaptation with the fire of a thousand suns so I know what I’m in for, though I’ve no doubt the book is going to pad it out wonderfully.

I love stories about inanimate objects coming to life and Christine is no exception. Plus, she’s pretty much my namesake, right?

The Stand

First come the days of the plague. Then come the dreams.

One of King’s bulkiest tomes and considered one of his all-time classics, I’m kind of nervous about starting it since I can barely lift it! My reading place of choice is in the bath so maybe I’ll be forced to rethink that.

I have a suspicion my plan to read Stephen King novels for the rest of the year is going to stretch well into 2020 thanks to this bad boy – but if Brex-shit does go ahead this Halloween, maybe a post-apocalyptic fantasy novel will be fitting. Bring it, Uncle Stephen.

Bag of Bones: Halloween Edition

He went to Dark Score Lake to confront his past. Now he might drown in it . . .

When Mike Noonan’s wife dies unexpectedly, the bestselling author suffers from writer’s block. Until he is drawn to his summer home, the beautiful lakeside retreat called Sara Laughs.

Here Mike finds the once familiar town in the tyrannical grip of millionaire Max Devore.

I know very little about this one but the premise sounds great. I’m excited to start digging in and might make this my next one. Like The Stand and Christine, it’s not a tiny book so will take some commitment.

Lucky for me I’m planning on dialing down the social side of things as we roll up to Halloween and beyond, so I have time. Lots of lovely nesting time.


Can we also take a moment to shout out the incredible 2019 Halloween Edition covers? Rose Madder in particular is a beauty. Even though I’ve read it quite recently, I wasn’t going to pass up the chance to display this print on my shelf. Carrie and Misery are both on my birthday/Christmas wish list.

The Bag of Bones and Christine editions were realeased in Halloween 2018 and are just as beautiful. I can’t wait to see what 2020 brings!

What are you reading?

Happy Birthday Stephen King!

“Just remember that Dumbo didn’t need the feather; the magic was in him.” ~ Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

What a year of SK goodness it has been!

At the beginning of 2019 I spent a bit of time with a dog named Cujo and I’m about to dig into The Stand, one of the many novels I should have read as an adolescent. At 1300 pages plus it will probably take me the rest of the year to finish but that’s just the price you pay to dwell in King’s world – and there’s nowhere I’d rather be.

As for cinematic outings, Pet Sematary didn’t exactly set my world alight but It Chapter 2 more than made up for it. I’ve seen it twice and could still go back for more. AND we still have The Shining sequel Doctor Sleep to look forward to before the year is out. It’s a good time to be a King fan, though truly when isn’t it?

Happy birthday to you, Mr King. Thanks for all the horror, the nightmares and the magic. And thank you for being such a big part of my life – then, now and always.

What’s your favourite Stephen King book/film/quote? 🎈

Our Stop

What if you almost missed the love of your life?

Romantic books aren’t really my go to but I should probably give them more of a chance if Our Stop is anything to go by.

Nadia is a bright, dazzling woman who just can’t seem to get herself together in the morning, vowing every week to start afresh (How hard do we all feel that?). One Monday on the 7.30 from Angel, ragged but on time, Nadia’s BFF texts a copy of the paper’s Missed Connections page which seemingly has a message in it – meant for her:

To the cute girl with the coffee stains on her dress. I’m the guy who’s always standing near the doors… Drink sometime?

Is she the cute girl? And if so, then who is the guy?

The guy as it happens is sensitive (and fit) Daniel, whose dad has just died. Daniel finds himself seeking comfort in the idea of Nadia and, at the suggestion of his flatmate, decides one day to do something about it. So begins a back and forth of epic proportion as the pair communicate via Missed Connections.

But when they try to meet IRL, they seem to keep missing each other. Is it really meant to be after all? Well, you’ll have to read to find out but… I think you have an inkling.

Our Stop really is delightful. Sure, it’s corny but as Iris is The Holiday says, and I often quote:

I like corny. I’m looking for corny in my life.

The central characters are likeable and I’ve a lot of time for the detail and ‘padding’ out that Williams’ has done with the supporting acts. I’ve a real soft spot for Daniel’s recently widowed mother, who has a meltdown over a stolen Henry the hoover – and Daniel’s new best friend, security guard Romeo. In addition to the will-they-won’t-they, we examine grief, the idea that we’re not grown up enough, new same-sex love, consent and toxic masculinity. You can tell it’s written by an intelligent and socially engaged author – and in places I really recognised her writing style from the posts I enjoy on Instagram.

There a couple of sections that stand out to me – Daniel comforting his mum when the hoover disappears (though we all know it’s not about the hoover), a chat about grief between two dudes at a Romeo & Juliet Secret Cinema event – Nadia educating Eddie on the brilliance of Nora Efron.

There’s a lot to like here and it’s a lovely Saturday afternoon, back in bed read.
Sure, as with most romance you have to suspend a little disbelief but isn’t that the point? Sometimes you have to be open to the idea of hope and that is what this is. Open your heart, put yourself out there and great things can happen.

I’m very much looking forward to the next novel from the same author.

Book details:

Our Stop
Publisher: Avon (8 Aug. 2019)
ISBN-10: 0008320527
ISBN-13: 978-0008320522
Bought new paperback for myself

What are you reading?

The Girl Before You

She was his. She was perfect. And then, she was gone.

Alice Bell has always had a bee in her bonnet about her husband’s past. She doesn’t know it all but catches snippets here and there, about his reputation at University where they met and the few extra-marital dalliances he’s had since they married. Ones she has so far chosen to overlook.

On a train one evening from Edinburgh back to London, Alice swears she locks eyes with a girl from their past – Ruth, who went missing, presumed drowned at university over fifteen years previously. When she mentions it to George, he brushes it off and she’s not convinced he didn’t know her better than he’s claiming. Subsequently, she has no choice but to keep digging for the truth. Wouldn’t we all?

Is it possible that beautiful, vibrant Ruth is still alive and not dead as everyone assumed? 

The Girl Before You unpacks the truth bit by bit, focusing on newly pregnant Alice as she becomes a super sleuth, reaching out to Ruth’s younger sister Naomi, who has never stopped hoping that her sister will one day return. As Alice gets warmer on the case of Ruth, she’s left cold by the things she’s learning about her own husband. Will life ever be the same again? 

‘The new GIRL ON THE TRAIN’ Observer

This book is right up my street and I devoured it in one day. It’s like crack, actually impossible to stop dipping into whenever you can get away with it. It was the perfect Bank Holiday read and I feel a little bit closer to it somehow because Nicola Rayner is a good friend’s sister in law. The writing flows wonderfully and the back and forth between female perspectives, all women who knew Ruth, doesn’t grate as much as it has in other books. I sometimes feel cheated by this device when I love one or two of the characters and don’t care about another, but all three are sympathetic and fleshed out enough to feel real.

It also looks at some very real and very relevant subject matter, including gas lighting and sexual coercion/assault which isn’t easy to read but opens up some interesting dialogue between some of the characters. In my opinion it’s better than GOTT and is definitely on par with Apple Tree Yard. If you liked either of those I think you’ll be very much into this little banger. 

I can’t wait for Nicola’s next book.

Book details:

The Girl Before You
Publisher: Avon (22 Aug. 2019)
ISBN-10: 0008332738
ISBN-13: 978-0008332730
Bought new paperback for myself

What are you reading?

 

No Big Deal

It would have been nice to have had a heroine like Emily growing up. Even if she is 75 times cooler than I’ve ever been. 

Navigating all your normal rites of passage in a fat body can be a minefield – friendship, school, the future, shagging, ROMANCE – but Emily doesn’t see why she should change. She’s well aware she’s one of the smartest in her year at school. She’s also cute, funny and ‘good at music’. While she still has all the normal teenage insecurities, she’s coming to realise it’s not her body holding her back, it’s the people around her and their attitudes toward it. 

RELATEABLE, MUCH?!

Emily worries about being left behind by her friendship group – and as the last to lose her virginity and get a boyfriend, she wonders if it’s the way she looks that’s the problem. Her mother is on a constant diet, imparting her own health wisdom on her daughter which kind of puts a dampener on their relationship. It also doesn’t help when she meets Joe, to whom she has an instant attraction. Could he possibly like her too?

Well of course he does because contrary to popular opinion, fat babes gets action to. But Joe’s not without his own problems and Emily has enough to contend with without wondering that she’s enough. Like where to go to university, a newly-slim best pal and general life stuff.

I read this in a day and mostly in the bath. Each chapter begins with a suitable song title which is cool. Given Emily is a some time DJ (and so is the author), it’s a nice touch. It also personalises it, reminding me of the feelings that went with the music I listened as I grew up.

Honestly, it’s refreshing to read about a fat protagonist, one that doesn’t have a makeover at the end. One that knows her worth despite societal pressure, one not willing to settle for anything less that the very best.

I enjoyed the last few chapters so much. As Emily works out Joe’s deal and subsequently refuses to accept it, I whooped. I also like the advice Emily gives to her friends. It’s completely balanced and wise beyond its years. There are flourishes that really suit the character and remind me too of all the reasons I’ve followed Bethany on Twitter for so long. Particularly the moment she asks her crush if he ever consumes art by women.

Emily is a role model for the age and I would love to spend more time in her world.

Book details:

No Big Deal
Publisher: Macmillan Children’s Books; Main Market edition (8 Aug. 2019)
ISBN-10: 1509870059
ISBN-13: 978-1509870059
Bought new paperback for myself

What are you reading?

 

Late Summer Reading List

I’ve spent the best part of the last two months trying to get through the first book in the Game of Thrones series – and although I’m enjoying it, there’s a lot to get to grips with. I love the story and many of the characters but I wouldn’t exactly call myself a fantasy girl. Thankfully, I’m coming to the end so I’ll be able to pick up something new soon. I have a couple of books waiting in the wings, hence this late Summer Reading List.

I’m only 28% through my Goodreads Reading Challenge and according to the app, will need to read two books a week for the rest of the year to hit my target of 50 books in 2019. Better get my skates on then, I guess.

What I’m Reading Next

The Corset by Laura Purcell

This book has been on my radar for a while. I loved The Silent Companions and found it genuinely eerie – so I have high hopes about the follow up. I’ve already spoken about it so I don’t want to repeat myself but I’m looking forward to dipping back into Purcell’s version of Gothic goodness.

Honestly, this is the kind of book I normally reserve for Autumn reading but fuck it. It’s windy enough out there to appeal to my nesting sensibilities, so bring it on.

My Thoughts Exactly by Lily Allen

“So, this is me. Lily Allen.

I am a mother, and I was a wife. I’m also a singer and a songwriter. I have loved and been let down. I’ve been stalked and assaulted. I am a success and a failure. I’ve been broken and full of hope. I am all these things and more.

I’m telling my truth because when women share their stories, loudly and clearly and honestly, things begin to change – for the better.

So, this is my story. These are my thoughts exactly.”

I’ve got a soft spot for Lily, who hasn’t always got it right but has always been seemingly honest, which I admire. She also been through an awful lot in her career and personal life, so I suspect this autobiography is going to be pretty eye-opening stuff. I’m holding out for heaps of scandal and a healthy dollop of bitching about other celebrities.

Our Stop by Laura Jane Williams

I follow Laura on social media and find her quite endearing, so when I saw she’d written a novel, even though it’s not my usual kind of book, I wanted to check it out.

When I was grabbing dinner in Sainsbury’s at the weekend, I found it for the bargain price of £2.99. Well I’m a girl of limited means, so what was I going to do?

The premise is this:

“What if you almost missed the love of your life?

Nadia gets the 7.30 train every morning without fail. Well, except if she oversleeps or wakes up at her friend Emma’s after too much wine.

Daniel really does get the 7.30 train every morning, which is easy because he hasn’t been able to sleep properly since his dad died.

One morning, Nadia’s eye catches sight of a post in the daily paper:

To the cute girl with the coffee stains on her dress. I’m the guy who’s always standing near the doors… Drink sometime?

So begins a not-quite-romance of near-misses, true love, and the power of the written word.”

Cute, huh?

No Big Deal by Bethany Rutter

Bethany is an internet staple for me, someone I’ve followed and admired for a long time. I’d go so far as to say she is one of the people most responsible for helping me change my way of thinking towards my own body. I’d definitely recommend you check her out on Twitter and beyond.

NBD is her debut fiction novel and I am so excited to meet her fat protagonist, Emily. I suspect this is a book I could really have done with back when I was a teen and I just really hope it gets the attention and acclaim it undoubtedly deserves.

A little outline:

“A warm, funny YA debut about a fat girl embarking on her first romance, female friendship, valuing herself and not settling, by one of the best body positive writers in the UK.”

So that’s me. Getting ready to hunker down with several good books and a duvet.

What are you reading?

Weekly Digest: Five Articles (#2)

A couple of articles I’ve enjoyed recently.

Photo by Fred Mouniguet on Unsplash

What I Learned From Dating Someone Totally Wrong For Me

I know what it’s like to be with the wrong person. I did it for 6 years, so this speaks to me on a deep level.

Particularly this bit:

The internal whisper that it was time to focus on my health and happiness became louder every time I chose to listen, and eventually it was the loudest voice in my mind.

I couldn’t act against myself and in favor of myself at the same time. I had to choose.


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8 Books Out In July In The UK That Will Make The Perfect Summer Reading Companion

I’m always down for a new book recommendation and some of these look bloody good. If I can be bothered to leave the house this Summer, I’ll be under a tree with a pile of books.


How to Have a Great Summer (According to Horror Movies)

This one definitely speaks for itself.


John Hughes Lied to Me

I love this essay, by author and journalist Caren Lissner. John Hughes most definitely has a lot to answer for (even though I love him still).


Pinhead-Hellraiser1

Pinhead Also Being Resurrected in a ‘Hellraiser’ TV Series!

We have such sights to show you

I am so stoked that this is soon to be a thing. Could there be anything more heavenly than more time with the Godfather of Pleasure & Pain, Pinhead himself? At this stage it’s not known if Doug Bradley will be reprising his legendary role but I do hope so.

Meanwhile, any Hellraiser endeavor that doesn’t include Julia (Clare Higgins) is a travesty.

What are you loving this week?

Books I Want to Read But Can’t Afford to Buy…

…So I really should join the library

Ugh there are so many books I want to read at the moment. I want them all and I really shouldn’t be buying any more books – in fact, I shouldn’t really buy new books at all. Except I want to support my local booksellers where I can, and I can’t walk past Waterstones without adding another title to the list.

Here’s what I have my eye on at the moment:

Red Snow by Will Dean

This is the second book in the Tuva Moodyson series and is the sequel to the brilliantly atmospheric Dark Pines. Tuva is a reporter for a local Swedish newspaper who just happens to be deaf. In this installment, she must investigate two deaths – one suicide, one cold-blooded murder. Are they connected?

I think I’d save this one for the colder months or a rainy weekend but it sounds great and I love the way Tuva is written.

The Ghost Photographer by Julie Rieger

I recently started listening to The Boo Crew podcast and in one of the first episodes I heard, they interview Julie, who seems pretty cool. I mean she’s cool anyway as a senior exec at one of the biggest movie studios in Hollywood – but throw in the fact she can see ghosts and entities in the photographs she takes – well, who could be cooler?

The book goes in on the trauma that led Julie to discovering this gift and honestly, I can’t wait to dip in. Even though paranormal activity is the one thing that truly, truly petrifies me – it’s also so fascinating.

The Bus on Thursday by Shirley Barrett

This book centers around Australian Eleanor Mellett, a woman with breast cancer who moves to a creepy small town to take a job as a primary school teacher. Living along in a remote cabin with no internet connection or phone line, our protagonist wonders what happened to the previous teacher she’s filling in for, why there are so many locks on the door and who the fuck is knocking it late at night.

Compared to Henry James’ Turn of the Screw and a little known author named Stephen King, it sounds right up my street.

The Corset by Laura Purcell

I read Purcell’s The Silent Companions not long ago and loved it. It genuinely chilled me to the bone in some places and I found it really refreshing. The Corset offers more Gothic goodness with this tale of two women who couldn’t be more different.

Dorothea Truelove is young, hot and rich while Ruth Butterham is young, poor and on trial for murder. When Dot volunteers at the prison, she finds herself drawn to Ruth. But Ruth harbors a dark secret and when she reveals it to her new friend – the women’s lives are entwined forever. Is Ruth a liar or is she a mad, bad murderer as she’s already confessed to be?

Normal People by Sally Rooney

I flipping loved Conversations with Friends so I’m stoked that NP is now out in paperback.

I actually don’t really mind what this story is about because I feel Rooney could make me fall in love with anything just so long as she was writing it – but this is a story about love and friendship that strikes up between popular Connell and loner Marianne, two very different people who just can’t seem to stay away from each other.

Lords of Chaos: The Bloody Rise of the Satanic Metal Underground by Michael Moynihan & Didrik Soderlind 

I recently watched and fell in love with the Lords of Chaos movie, starring Rory Culkin which surprises me a lot. I mean, I didn’t think Norwegian Black Metal would be up there on my list of Stuff I Dig but here we are.

I have since grown truly obsessed with the rise of this music genre – and the horrific murder (and lead up to it) of Mayhem front-man Euronymous, at the hands of Kristian ‘Varg’ Vikernes. Honestly, it seems the BM scene was the bitchiest place on earth and I’ve been in some of my own in my time. True crime and men in tight black jeans are my jam, yo.

The Girl Before You by Nicola Rayner

I’m including this because a) it sounds like a banger and b) it was written by my friend’s sister-in-law. Which is so cool. Compared as these thrillers typically are to The Girl on the Train, TGBY focusses on the relationship between Alice and her MP husband, George.

Alice has always had a thing about the women who came before her – and George’s rep as a womaniser certainly precedes him. But when she falls pregnant, her unease turns to obsession – in particular, she can’t get one woman from his past out of her head: Ruth.

Ruth went missing when she and George were first year students at university and was never found. When Alice sees a woman who looks just like the mysterious Ruth, she starts to think there’s more to the story that her husband is telling her…

Cannot. Wait.

What are you reading?

Cujo

I’ve spend most of this week feeling slightly bummed out and I swear to god it’s Stephen King’s fault. I know I’m way behind on Cujo’s story but I did not expect to end in such a devastating way – I guess that’s why it’s so effective. While you’ve got your eye firmly planted on Cujo, you don’t think about anything else.

Most readers (and their dogs LOL) will know the story of Cujo – and obviously I always had a rough idea of the plot, not least because it seems to be referenced all the time in other King books. It is good finally to have the details for myself. My husband said he never liked it because he felt too sorry for Cujo – and boy do I agree with that.

*Spoilers*

If you don’t know, Cujo is a massive, lovable Saint Bernard – the beloved pet of ten-year-old Brett Camber, a mechanics son. His father Joe is a dominating influence who beats his wife Charity and drinks with his neighbour Gary in his down time.

Across town (the story is set in SK staple, Castle Rock, Maine) the Trentons, Donna and Vic live with their little son Tad. They’ve got their own shit going on – Tad is haunted by the ‘monster in the closet’, while Donna is dealing with the aftermath of a pre-marital fling. Vic’s ad business is crumbling and he has to leave town just as he finds out about the affair – none of them are doing that great, what will a fateful meeting with a rabid Saint Bernard throw into the mix?

Alternative film poster for the 1983 Cujo adaptation

Well, one day of course Cuj goes for a run in the fields around the Camber home and ends up chasing a rabbit into a deep burrow. Alas, within the burrow live a family of rabies infected bats – and they’re not cool with the intrusion. Cujo gets bitten and so begins his tragic demise, via a horrific swansong of death and destruction. Bad doggie!

As events bring Donna and Tad directly into the path of Cujo’s fury, I was on the edge of my seat. It’s so effective and the final, agonising stand-off between (wo)man and beast is incredible. Donna is a brilliant character, flawed and fiesty, and hard as fuck. I love her. As Vic realises something is not okay at home and has to haul ass back to the Rock to rescue his family, Donna is taking care of business herself.

Meanwhile, Brett and Charity are miles away visiting family, clueless about the carnage they’ve left behind. Charity is secretly worrying about her son turning out like her abusive husband and contemplating divorce, while Brett can’t stop worrying about Cujo back home.

This book was very good and I enjoyed myself but I hated the thought of Cuj in pain. And I was in no way prepared for the Trenton family’s own tragedy. I don’t know why I was so invested in a perfect, happy ending. I must have forgotten who I was reading for a second.

Book details:

Cujo
Publisher: Cornerstone
ISBN-10: 0099975009
ISBN-13: 978-0099975007
Bought secondhand paperback for myself

What are you reading?