The Forbidden

As she prepared to leave the sun went in, and the bands of light faded. She glanced over her shoulder at the boarded windows, and saw for the first time that one four-word slogan had been sprayed on the wall beneath them. “Sweets to the sweet” it read.

I’m currently reading Christine but as I mentioned before, it’s quite the sizeable tome and hasn’t been the quickest read. I felt like taking a quick break from Uncle Stephen for a moment to read this short by his horror contemporary, Clive Barker. In fact, the anthology that houses this story – Books of Blood: Volumes 4-6 – features a cover blurb from the man himself: “Clive Barker is so good I am almost literally tongue-tied.”

Cute, huh?

The Forbidden in case you weren’t aware, is the story that inspired (and was adapted into) my favourite horror movie of all time, Candyman (1992).  So no prizes for guessing why I wanted to read it. The novella is based in England rather than the Chicago of the film which really intrigued me – and tells tale of Helen, a post-grad student doing her thesis on urban graffiti. When she visits the rundown Spector Street Estate to take some photographs for her project, she learns about a horrible murder and becomes just a little bit too involved in the sinister goings on.

Her weary body understood. Her nerves, tired of jangling, understood. The sweetness he offered was life withoutliving: was to be dead, but remembered everywhere; immortal in gossip and graffiti.”Be my victim,” he said.”No…” she murmured.

*Spoilers*

I loved it. The Candyman of the story is every bit as seductive as my boo Tony Todd but he’s terrifying in such a visceral way. The way he’s described is so different and heinous, yet there’s still something appealing about him, like giving into the death he’s offering would be the sweetest relief and delicious to boot.

Some of the names are the same as in the movie (Trevor, Anne-Marie, Bernadette) – even patronising shit-bag Purcell makes an appearance – and I loved his little segment but they are quite different characters. Trevor is still a cheating bastard but this time Helen turns a blind eye, claiming not to give a single shit when he disappears for two nights straight. The setting is very similar, even if the locations are not, right down to the rotten public toilet in which an  alleged attack is made on a young man with learning disabilities.

The crime surrounding Anne-Marie and her son is far more sinister and graphic however and I find the realism of the estate much creepier than I do Cabrini Green. Maybe it’s just how normal and mundane Anne-Marie’s life seems, how can such horror live side by side her tiny maisonette, while she makes tea for Helen and moans about the council?

A must-read for any horror fan and I’m quite keen to read the rest of the stories now. Barker writes beautiful prose that sure as hell suits the elegance of the Candyman. I’ll keep you updated on my progress.

Book details:

The Forbidden (from Books of Blood: Volumes 4-6)
Publisher: Sphere (1 Feb. 1988)
ISBN-10: 0751512257
ISBN-13: 978-0751512250
Borrowed

What are you reading?

B•F•R•W•W – The New Digest

The things I am currently digging in five easy categories – Bingeing (TV), Feeling, Reading, Watching (Films), Writing.

Bingeing

There’s a lot going on TV wise this Autumn/Winter but the most exciting is Pose Season 2 which has already succeeded in making me sob like a baby five minutes into the first episode. I’m trying not to smash the whole series in a day but it’s very moreish.

This season is centered around Madonna’s Vogue record, inspired by the NY ballrooms – House ma Blanca (Mj Rodriguez) is convinced this will bring the community mainstream acceptance while Pray Tell (Billy Porter) has seen it all before. Both are dealing with the HIV epidemic and fighting for their human rights – while Elektra (Dominique Jackson) is enjoying the spoils of her new (so far secret) career and Angel (Indya Moore ) is taking the fashion industry by storm. If you haven’t already, I highly recommend this amazing show – it is everything.

Obviously I’m all over Ru Paul’s Drag Race UK as well. Team Divina all the way.

Also watching: WatchmenSwamp ThingThe Young OffendersCreepshow

Feeling

I’ve decided not to fight Christmas this year – so I’m feeling festive. I didn’t get it at all last year so honestly fuck it, why not ride the wave with everyone else? My manager has already put up her tree and I’ve so far watched more Christmassy flicks than I care to admit – I’m saving Love Actually (2003) and The Holiday (2006), don’t worry. I’m thinking of making my own Christmas cards too – which is frankly obscene.

It’s also my birthday in just over a week and I wasn’t going to do anything but got talked into at least having an intimate dinner so there’s that to look forward to. There are six of us and I’m going to put on a new dress and false lashes – and enjoy the excellent company. I know I’m loved and completely blessed – and I am forever grateful for my loved ones.

Reading

Yes I’m reading more Stephen King – it’s the perfect time of the year for spooky and Christine is a wonderful story. My horror soulmate Matt is reading it at the same time and the regular check-ins with each other are the best bit. I will admit to finding this slow going though. It’s not Christine’s fault – I love it when I dip in – I think it’s honestly because the book’s so physically heavy, and it’s harder to read in the tub (my prime reading place).

I promise to review it when I’m done.

Also reading: My Favorite Thing is MonstersBuffy (Comics)

Watching

I’ve just re-watched Nerve (2016) on Amazon Prime, which was a lot better than I remembered – and I bloody love Emma Roberts. I’ve filled you in on Doctor Sleep which was v. good and of course, my shameful Christmas consumption.

My next cinema visit is to see Last Christmas with Helen on Tuesday – which I feel will be the final ingredient needed to get me feeling appropriately festive. I’m pretty sure I’ll be ruining my make-up for Emilia Clarke and I’m cool with it. Crying is cathartic, yo.

Also watching: Before I Wake (2016) • Gerald’s Game (2017) – I’m very much having a Mike Flanagan revival.

Writing

I wrote this, didn’t I? That’s about it on the writing front, unless you count the assessments I’ve done for my advanced Wicca course which is so fun. I’m loving it. I’ve submitted my first four assessments and come out with a 97% pass rate so far. I’m considering doing Astrology and Tarot next.

What are you up to?

The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon

I introduced you to my new favourite protagonist last week but I still want to talk about the full novel because I really loved it and devoured it in two days. For a Stephen King book it’s like a tasty snack rather than a main meal – and sometimes, that’s just enough to satisfy.

Tricia is lost in the woods. But she’s not alone . . .

The world has teeth and it could bite you with them anytime it wanted. Trisha McFarland discovered this when she was nine years old. Lost in the woods.

Trisha McFarland is just nine years old when, on a hike with her mum and brother, she wanders off the beaten track and gets lost in the forest. Her family, too busy bitterly arguing to notice, don’t discover her gone until it’s too late. In mere hours, Trish is so lost that it doesn’t feel like she’ll ever see or hear another human being again. Although, judging from the creeping feeling she has, she’s definitely not alone out there.

While Trish stumbles through the woods, determined to find her way back to her old life, she imagines she is joined by her favourite baseball player, Tom Gordon and sometimes her best friend Pepsi. At night she grabs a few moments with her Walkman, catching up on the ball games and sometimes, news reports about her own disappearance. By day she eeks out the small packed lunch in her backpack but little by little she must rely on the basic survival techniques her mother has taught her.

As the clock ticks and the authorities fail to retrieve her, she believes she is being gained on by something not altogether human. If her fever dreams are anything to go by she has something new to fear besides starvation and eating the wrong berries: The God of the Lost in all his wasp-faced goodness.

Can Trish make it to the end of this horrible journey, despite all the bites, the sickness, the hunger and her mystery stalker? You bet your arse she can.

The book is incredible vivid and King, as usual gives us a very well-rounded central character to root for. He plays with reality a lot and again with the concept of self-preservation via an inner fantasy world.

While I couldn’t 100% be sure we’d get a happy ending – King has absolutely left me floored with the unexpected more than once – I was so satisfied by this ending. A definite recommendation from me if you fancy a quick but impactful read.

Book details:

The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon
Publisher: Hodder Paperbacks (19 Sept. 2019)
ISBN-10: 1529311128
ISBN-13: 978-1529311129
Bought Halloween edition paperback for myself

What are you reading?

Hallowe’en Party

Hercule Poirot takes on one of the most challenging cases of his career.

I haven’t read nearly enough Agatha Christie, even though I know lots of her stories via their TV/Film adaptations. I’m not sure Hallowe’en Party was the best place to start but I chose it because of the title and I can’t say I didn’t have a good time hanging with Hercule and speculating about all the villagers of Woodleigh Common.

HP revolves around the shocking murder of thirteen year old Joyce Reynolds, who finds herself face down in the apple bobbing tub at the end of a Halloween party hosted by Rowena Drake.

Mere hours before the tragic death, Joyce had been boasting publicly about having witnessed a murder. Now everybody’s a suspect in hers. Ariadne Oliver, well known author and friend of Poirot is present on the night of the incident – and calls upon her old pal to come and have a look around for himself. Can Poirot, with his well-seasoned eye for detail, work out who would commit such a heinous act?

As the story unravels we learn more about the villagers – of their connections to one another, of the secrets that lie just below the surface. Joyce, it seems was not a well-liked little girl and already had a reputation for being a big fat liar. But why would anyone kill her and in such a horrible way?

When Poirot finds out about some seemingly random murders commited in Woodleigh over the years – as well as a dodgy will made out to a shady au pair – he becomes a dog with a bone. Could they all be related?

Well it’s not for us to uncover the truth – Poirot’s got this – but it’s fun for us to guess.

While this book is fun enough it was originally criticised for its poor characterisation and loose ends – “Not Christie’s best”. I can see why, it’s quite forgettable, to the point I had to read up on the ending again to remind myself.

I love Ariadne Oliver’s friendship with Poirot though – and it is never wasted time to take a wander with such a legendary character.

Book details:

Hallowe’en Party
Publisher: HarperCollins (24 Sept. 2015)
ISBN-10: 9780008129613
ISBN-13: 978-0008129613
Bought new paperback for myself

What are you reading?

I Wish I Knew How To Quit Boo – Stephen King Edition

I’ve decided to leave the rest of my year (and then some) open for Stephen King. Books, that is but if the man himself wanted to stop by and take me on a couple of dates I probably wouldn’t say no. Imagine the chat.

Anyway, the UK is a rainy grey place right now so what better environment in which to get cosy with The King? Loose jersey lounge wear, blankets and lashings of horror – it’s the only medicine I need. I’ve made a loose plan to read in tandem with my horror partner Matt but he’s already speeding ahead on our first book so we might have to go our own ways eventually.

Here’s what’s on my reading list:

The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon: Halloween Edition

Tricia is lost in the woods. But she’s not alone . . .

‘The world has teeth and it could bite you with them anytime it wanted. Trisha McFarland discovered this when she was nine years old. Lost in the woods.’

Trisha has only veered a little way off the trail. But in her panic to get back to the path, Trisha takes a turning that leads into the tangled undergrowth. Deeper and deeper in the terrifying woods.

This is first on the list mostly because it’s considerably shorter than the others. I’m about 50 pages in and it’s a real page turner. Trisha is nine years old and sick of the arguing between her mum and brother, following her parents’ divorce. On a hiking trip, she takes just a second to have a pee and gets lost. Alas the woods is a big place for a small girl – and it seems she isn’t the only one out there…

TGWLTG is so far wonderfully (horribly) visual and real – and Trisha really feels like a girl her age, albeit a wise one. I like her a lot and I’m looking forward to the rest of her story. Please let her be okay!

Christine: Halloween Edition

Jealousy isn’t a green-eyed monster. She’s a red Plymouth Fury.

Christine, blood-red, fat, and finned, is twenty. Her promise lies all in her past. Greedy and big, she is Arnie’s obsession, a ’58 Plymouth Fury. Broken down but not finished.

There is still power in her – a frightening power that leaks like sump oil, staining and corrupting. A malign power that corrodes the mind and turns ownership into Possession.

‘This is the story of a lover’s triangle…’

Matt got me this last year for my birthday and I’ve been waiting for the best time to crack her open ever since. I love John Carpenter’s 1983 adaptation with the fire of a thousand suns so I know what I’m in for, though I’ve no doubt the book is going to pad it out wonderfully.

I love stories about inanimate objects coming to life and Christine is no exception. Plus, she’s pretty much my namesake, right?

The Stand

First come the days of the plague. Then come the dreams.

One of King’s bulkiest tomes and considered one of his all-time classics, I’m kind of nervous about starting it since I can barely lift it! My reading place of choice is in the bath so maybe I’ll be forced to rethink that.

I have a suspicion my plan to read Stephen King novels for the rest of the year is going to stretch well into 2020 thanks to this bad boy – but if Brex-shit does go ahead this Halloween, maybe a post-apocalyptic fantasy novel will be fitting. Bring it, Uncle Stephen.

Bag of Bones: Halloween Edition

He went to Dark Score Lake to confront his past. Now he might drown in it . . .

When Mike Noonan’s wife dies unexpectedly, the bestselling author suffers from writer’s block. Until he is drawn to his summer home, the beautiful lakeside retreat called Sara Laughs.

Here Mike finds the once familiar town in the tyrannical grip of millionaire Max Devore.

I know very little about this one but the premise sounds great. I’m excited to start digging in and might make this my next one. Like The Stand and Christine, it’s not a tiny book so will take some commitment.

Lucky for me I’m planning on dialing down the social side of things as we roll up to Halloween and beyond, so I have time. Lots of lovely nesting time.


Can we also take a moment to shout out the incredible 2019 Halloween Edition covers? Rose Madder in particular is a beauty. Even though I’ve read it quite recently, I wasn’t going to pass up the chance to display this print on my shelf. Carrie and Misery are both on my birthday/Christmas wish list.

The Bag of Bones and Christine editions were realeased in Halloween 2018 and are just as beautiful. I can’t wait to see what 2020 brings!

What are you reading?

Our Stop

What if you almost missed the love of your life?

Romantic books aren’t really my go to but I should probably give them more of a chance if Our Stop is anything to go by.

Nadia is a bright, dazzling woman who just can’t seem to get herself together in the morning, vowing every week to start afresh (How hard do we all feel that?). One Monday on the 7.30 from Angel, ragged but on time, Nadia’s BFF texts a copy of the paper’s Missed Connections page which seemingly has a message in it – meant for her:

To the cute girl with the coffee stains on her dress. I’m the guy who’s always standing near the doors… Drink sometime?

Is she the cute girl? And if so, then who is the guy?

The guy as it happens is sensitive (and fit) Daniel, whose dad has just died. Daniel finds himself seeking comfort in the idea of Nadia and, at the suggestion of his flatmate, decides one day to do something about it. So begins a back and forth of epic proportion as the pair communicate via Missed Connections.

But when they try to meet IRL, they seem to keep missing each other. Is it really meant to be after all? Well, you’ll have to read to find out but… I think you have an inkling.

Our Stop really is delightful. Sure, it’s corny but as Iris is The Holiday says, and I often quote:

I like corny. I’m looking for corny in my life.

The central characters are likeable and I’ve a lot of time for the detail and ‘padding’ out that Williams’ has done with the supporting acts. I’ve a real soft spot for Daniel’s recently widowed mother, who has a meltdown over a stolen Henry the hoover – and Daniel’s new best friend, security guard Romeo. In addition to the will-they-won’t-they, we examine grief, the idea that we’re not grown up enough, new same-sex love, consent and toxic masculinity. You can tell it’s written by an intelligent and socially engaged author – and in places I really recognised her writing style from the posts I enjoy on Instagram.

There a couple of sections that stand out to me – Daniel comforting his mum when the hoover disappears (though we all know it’s not about the hoover), a chat about grief between two dudes at a Romeo & Juliet Secret Cinema event – Nadia educating Eddie on the brilliance of Nora Efron.

There’s a lot to like here and it’s a lovely Saturday afternoon, back in bed read.
Sure, as with most romance you have to suspend a little disbelief but isn’t that the point? Sometimes you have to be open to the idea of hope and that is what this is. Open your heart, put yourself out there and great things can happen.

I’m very much looking forward to the next novel from the same author.

Book details:

Our Stop
Publisher: Avon (8 Aug. 2019)
ISBN-10: 0008320527
ISBN-13: 978-0008320522
Bought new paperback for myself

What are you reading?

The Corset

I thoroughly enjoyed Purcell’s The Silent Companions and found it satisfyingly creepy, perfect for this time of year. So when The Corset came out in paperback I grabbed it quickly and couldn’t wait to dive in.

To a certain extent it’s as good as TSC but it isn’t without its issues and that main issue for me is the ending. Before I go into that though, a bit about the story. I think the premise itself is brilliant and quite unique.

There have been a few stories in the past about haunted clothing (not that I can name any of them beyond In Fabric, which hasn’t even had the decency to have a proper release yet) but the concept of vindictive embroidery really appeals to me. Imagine putting all your rage and hatred into your work and seeing very tangible results. It’s pure witchcraft and as you know, I’m all about the witch these days, even if it is dark magic.

That doesn’t mean I can’t enjoy it in my fiction though and I really love the character of Ruth, a young girl sentenced to death for the murder of her mistress. When high society do-gooder Dorothea Truelove takes it upon herself to start visiting Ruth is gaol while she awaits her trial, the whole story of how she came to be a murderess unravels – but is she really as bad as she believes or is she a victim herself?

Dorothea meanwhile has her own agenda, namely the study of phrenology and she really wants to get her hands on Ruth’s skull. She’s also being pressured by her ol’ dad to marry since she’s just turned five and twenty – and should probably get her skates on. Little does he know that she’s in love with a common or garden bobby!

Anyway, we’re here for the darkness, aren’t we? As Ruth embroiders a macabre picture for us we get plenty of that. Bullied and poor, things take a terrible turn when her beloved mother falls pregnant. Ruth is forced to leave school to help her seamstress mum with her workload, particularly a large order for a local dressmaker. When the baby arrives everything changes and Ruth realises she may have a secret power. Does she though or is she simply mad, after years of abuse?

Well, via flashback Ruth fills us in on her sewing skills and the horrible lifestyle to which she quickly becomes accustomed. As the terror grows so does her bitterness and rage – and all that has to go somewhere. I won’t go into it too much but it is a satisfying read.

Alongside Ruth’s woes we have the slightly less dramatic issues of Dorothea, whose beauty and class make her seem much less of a victim – but there’s something going on beneath the pristine surface – and maybe she and Ruth aren’t that different after all.

I really enjoyed myself but I did find the climax a little clumsy. It’s not that I didn’t understand it, it’s more that it wasn’t ironed out in quite the same way as the rest of the book and felt rushed. It’s an interesting ending and a good one but it comes at you fast – and it took the book from a solid five to a four in my eyes. Nevertheless, I’m excited for Bone China and I love Purcell’s Gothic hand.

Book details: The Corset
Publisher: Raven Books (2 May 2019)
ISBN-10: 1408889528
ISBN-13: 978-1408889527
Bought new paperback for myself

What are you reading?

The Girl Before You

She was his. She was perfect. And then, she was gone.

Alice Bell has always had a bee in her bonnet about her husband’s past. She doesn’t know it all but catches snippets here and there, about his reputation at University where they met and the few extra-marital dalliances he’s had since they married. Ones she has so far chosen to overlook.

On a train one evening from Edinburgh back to London, Alice swears she locks eyes with a girl from their past – Ruth, who went missing, presumed drowned at university over fifteen years previously. When she mentions it to George, he brushes it off and she’s not convinced he didn’t know her better than he’s claiming. Subsequently, she has no choice but to keep digging for the truth. Wouldn’t we all?

Is it possible that beautiful, vibrant Ruth is still alive and not dead as everyone assumed? 

The Girl Before You unpacks the truth bit by bit, focusing on newly pregnant Alice as she becomes a super sleuth, reaching out to Ruth’s younger sister Naomi, who has never stopped hoping that her sister will one day return. As Alice gets warmer on the case of Ruth, she’s left cold by the things she’s learning about her own husband. Will life ever be the same again? 

‘The new GIRL ON THE TRAIN’ Observer

This book is right up my street and I devoured it in one day. It’s like crack, actually impossible to stop dipping into whenever you can get away with it. It was the perfect Bank Holiday read and I feel a little bit closer to it somehow because Nicola Rayner is a good friend’s sister in law. The writing flows wonderfully and the back and forth between female perspectives, all women who knew Ruth, doesn’t grate as much as it has in other books. I sometimes feel cheated by this device when I love one or two of the characters and don’t care about another, but all three are sympathetic and fleshed out enough to feel real.

It also looks at some very real and very relevant subject matter, including gas lighting and sexual coercion/assault which isn’t easy to read but opens up some interesting dialogue between some of the characters. In my opinion it’s better than GOTT and is definitely on par with Apple Tree Yard. If you liked either of those I think you’ll be very much into this little banger. 

I can’t wait for Nicola’s next book.

Book details:

The Girl Before You
Publisher: Avon (22 Aug. 2019)
ISBN-10: 0008332738
ISBN-13: 978-0008332730
Bought new paperback for myself

What are you reading?

 

No Big Deal

It would have been nice to have had a heroine like Emily growing up. Even if she is 75 times cooler than I’ve ever been. 

Navigating all your normal rites of passage in a fat body can be a minefield – friendship, school, the future, shagging, ROMANCE – but Emily doesn’t see why she should change. She’s well aware she’s one of the smartest in her year at school. She’s also cute, funny and ‘good at music’. While she still has all the normal teenage insecurities, she’s coming to realise it’s not her body holding her back, it’s the people around her and their attitudes toward it. 

RELATEABLE, MUCH?!

Emily worries about being left behind by her friendship group – and as the last to lose her virginity and get a boyfriend, she wonders if it’s the way she looks that’s the problem. Her mother is on a constant diet, imparting her own health wisdom on her daughter which kind of puts a dampener on their relationship. It also doesn’t help when she meets Joe, to whom she has an instant attraction. Could he possibly like her too?

Well of course he does because contrary to popular opinion, fat babes gets action to. But Joe’s not without his own problems and Emily has enough to contend with without wondering that she’s enough. Like where to go to university, a newly-slim best pal and general life stuff.

I read this in a day and mostly in the bath. Each chapter begins with a suitable song title which is cool. Given Emily is a some time DJ (and so is the author), it’s a nice touch. It also personalises it, reminding me of the feelings that went with the music I listened as I grew up.

Honestly, it’s refreshing to read about a fat protagonist, one that doesn’t have a makeover at the end. One that knows her worth despite societal pressure, one not willing to settle for anything less that the very best.

I enjoyed the last few chapters so much. As Emily works out Joe’s deal and subsequently refuses to accept it, I whooped. I also like the advice Emily gives to her friends. It’s completely balanced and wise beyond its years. There are flourishes that really suit the character and remind me too of all the reasons I’ve followed Bethany on Twitter for so long. Particularly the moment she asks her crush if he ever consumes art by women.

Emily is a role model for the age and I would love to spend more time in her world.

Book details:

No Big Deal
Publisher: Macmillan Children’s Books; Main Market edition (8 Aug. 2019)
ISBN-10: 1509870059
ISBN-13: 978-1509870059
Bought new paperback for myself

What are you reading?

 

Late Summer Reading List

I’ve spent the best part of the last two months trying to get through the first book in the Game of Thrones series – and although I’m enjoying it, there’s a lot to get to grips with. I love the story and many of the characters but I wouldn’t exactly call myself a fantasy girl. Thankfully, I’m coming to the end so I’ll be able to pick up something new soon. I have a couple of books waiting in the wings, hence this late Summer Reading List.

I’m only 28% through my Goodreads Reading Challenge and according to the app, will need to read two books a week for the rest of the year to hit my target of 50 books in 2019. Better get my skates on then, I guess.

What I’m Reading Next

The Corset by Laura Purcell

This book has been on my radar for a while. I loved The Silent Companions and found it genuinely eerie – so I have high hopes about the follow up. I’ve already spoken about it so I don’t want to repeat myself but I’m looking forward to dipping back into Purcell’s version of Gothic goodness.

Honestly, this is the kind of book I normally reserve for Autumn reading but fuck it. It’s windy enough out there to appeal to my nesting sensibilities, so bring it on.

My Thoughts Exactly by Lily Allen

“So, this is me. Lily Allen.

I am a mother, and I was a wife. I’m also a singer and a songwriter. I have loved and been let down. I’ve been stalked and assaulted. I am a success and a failure. I’ve been broken and full of hope. I am all these things and more.

I’m telling my truth because when women share their stories, loudly and clearly and honestly, things begin to change – for the better.

So, this is my story. These are my thoughts exactly.”

I’ve got a soft spot for Lily, who hasn’t always got it right but has always been seemingly honest, which I admire. She also been through an awful lot in her career and personal life, so I suspect this autobiography is going to be pretty eye-opening stuff. I’m holding out for heaps of scandal and a healthy dollop of bitching about other celebrities.

Our Stop by Laura Jane Williams

I follow Laura on social media and find her quite endearing, so when I saw she’d written a novel, even though it’s not my usual kind of book, I wanted to check it out.

When I was grabbing dinner in Sainsbury’s at the weekend, I found it for the bargain price of £2.99. Well I’m a girl of limited means, so what was I going to do?

The premise is this:

“What if you almost missed the love of your life?

Nadia gets the 7.30 train every morning without fail. Well, except if she oversleeps or wakes up at her friend Emma’s after too much wine.

Daniel really does get the 7.30 train every morning, which is easy because he hasn’t been able to sleep properly since his dad died.

One morning, Nadia’s eye catches sight of a post in the daily paper:

To the cute girl with the coffee stains on her dress. I’m the guy who’s always standing near the doors… Drink sometime?

So begins a not-quite-romance of near-misses, true love, and the power of the written word.”

Cute, huh?

No Big Deal by Bethany Rutter

Bethany is an internet staple for me, someone I’ve followed and admired for a long time. I’d go so far as to say she is one of the people most responsible for helping me change my way of thinking towards my own body. I’d definitely recommend you check her out on Twitter and beyond.

NBD is her debut fiction novel and I am so excited to meet her fat protagonist, Emily. I suspect this is a book I could really have done with back when I was a teen and I just really hope it gets the attention and acclaim it undoubtedly deserves.

A little outline:

“A warm, funny YA debut about a fat girl embarking on her first romance, female friendship, valuing herself and not settling, by one of the best body positive writers in the UK.”

So that’s me. Getting ready to hunker down with several good books and a duvet.

What are you reading?